change

Introducing maaple

I am proud to introduce you to maaple: it is an organisation through which we hope to make positive change in the UK.

It stands for the Movement for Asexuality Awareness, Protection, Learning and Equality. If you’ve read my blog in the past, you’ll have seen that asexuals are not protected by equality legislation in this country, and that it can be difficult to be openly asexual. We hope that maaple will become a force for positive change that benefits everyone: not just asexuals.

We have three aims.

  1. To improve the Equality Act 2010 to protect more people: namely those that are excluded by the legislation currently. This includes asexuals, but others too.
  2. To improve school sex, health and relationship education to give children the information they need to make mature, informed and safe choices. This includes teaching children about the (a)sexual spectrum and gender identity.
  3. To assist organisations and institutions to offer equal opportunities to individuals that identify as being on the asexual spectrum and so that they feel included and welcomed.

There is more information on our website, maaple.org.uk. We also have a Facebook page and a Twitter account, with other media to follow. We look forward to hearing your feedback!

Creating support for change

By |February 7th, 2015|Asexuality updates|0 Comments

Yesterday I visited Loughborough to attend an LGBT staff group meeting. I’d been in touch because I was a little frustrated that they said they welcomed members that were lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender as identified in the Equality Act 2010. To their credit, they immediately changed their group name to the LGBT+ staff group.

It was particularly reassuring how seriously this group is being taken, with the Vice Chancellor attending the meeting and taking an interest in the issues that had been discussed. For my part, I introduced myself and stated why it was important for me to join.

I said that asexuality is known as the “invisible orientation”. We don’t generally make a fuss and keep ourselves to ourselves. While that works most of the time, it also means that we’re overlooked for things like the Equality Act and leave ourselves open to abuse and ignorance in general. If we’re to bring about change, we have to engage with those that can help us and find common ground.

I’m quite pleased I joined. They were a friendly and welcoming group and there is an intent to embrace more members and to raise awareness. We can help each other out in that regard.

Welcome to 2015!

By |January 1st, 2015|Recent news|0 Comments

Well, 2014 was quite a remarkable year in many ways, but I won’t look back so much. There were ups and downs, as everyone has. The year ended sadly, with the passing of my grandfather; but it also ended with being offered a job at Oxford Brookes University as a postdoctoral pedagogic research assistant. It’s a fantastic opportunity and I can’t wait to start!

So I’m hoping for positive change this year: a new life in Oxford; a better sharing of understanding of asexuality; transitioning from a 20-something to a 30; meeting new people.

I’ve made friends with so many lovely people over the past 12 months. I’d love to meet more of them this year.

Trust Me

By |October 6th, 2010|Quick thoughts|0 Comments

Seems I’m on the move again. Awaiting confirmation, I’ve been accepted to study for a PhD at Loughborough University in Mathematics Education. I should be starting in December.

It’s really quite exciting but also rather scary. It’s allowing me to continue in maths education but it is pretty much an entirely new beginning. It closes a chapter at Keele, but perhaps doesn’t end the story; and opens a new one, which surely won’t be the last!