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Asexuality as a diagnostic tool

“Asexual is a tool and not a label,” David Jay, who in 2001 created the Asexual Visi­bility and Education Network (AVEN), told Medical Daily. “You pick it up to understand yourself more deeply. You never need to make a statement about yourself. You can make a statement about the best understanding you have now and build on that.”

Asexuality Is Real: How A Rare Orientation Helps Us Understand Human Sexuality, Medical Daily

This article provides some insight into the pathology of asexuality and distinguishing lack of sexual attraction from low libido and hypoactive sexual desire disorder. Understanding these differences could have a profound effect on how we understand human sexuality more broadly.

The article culminates with the above quote from David Jay. It is interesting to think of “asexual” as a tool, rather than a label, to help understand oneself, rather than to classify oneself.

Into the mind of a mathematician

By |January 26th, 2015|Quick thoughts|0 Comments

“… what is a teacher? You see, mathematicians don’t think of themselves as teachers. That should be clear. They lecture. Sometimes they like to and sometimes they don’t. But that’s not what you [as a teacher] think of. You think of yourself as doing mathematics [while students observe].”

One of Gustin’s participants believed that mathematicians don’t really teach: rather they imitate and demonstrate and encourage others to do the same.

Gustin, W. C. (1985), The development of exceptional research mathematicians, in B. S. Bloom, ed., Developing Talent in Young People, New York, pp. 270–331.

Asexuals want orientation recognised

“I want it to get into sex ed and sexual counselors,” Decker, a writer and an asexual, said of the book. “So that it will work into the common knowledge and common narrative about what sexuality is.”

Asexuals want orientation recognized, Valley News.

Coming out of invisibility

But as soon as people started to publicly equate asexuality with other queer identities, like homosexuality or transgender, there was backlash from LGBTQI groups. Some believed that asexuality as an identity and asexuals as individuals were trying to hop onto the LGBTQI train without facing the same levels of visible discrimination; some accused them of being closeted queer folk unwilling to disclose their true sexual identity and thus hiding behind a false label.

Asexual activists refute this by noting that they are still classified as a pathological disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and described as individuals with low self esteem, social anxiety, and depression in studies on their identity.

Coming Out of Invisibility, Mark Hay, Good Magazine

This post has been making waves in the ace community. The links to related content strongly support the messages that the author wishes to convey: asexuality is, indeed, a thing and there are a lot of issues that are yet to be addressed. In particular, discrimination and persecution does exist.

Asexuality should be recognised, not ignored

It was hard finding a place to feel safe and accepted when society said I didn’t fit what was considered normal and the queer community said I wasn’t queer enough. Then I discovered Asexuality Awareness Week.

From Julie Nguyen at the Daily Cougar.

The article was published in the week following Asexual Awareness Week (AAW), and there’s an interesting argument that AAW is self-serving and doesn’t do much to promote awareness of asexuality.

The quote above gives some idea as to why that is. I know many asexual people that aren’t “out”. There are more still that have been selective in who they are open to about their sexuality. The reality is that asexuality remains taboo: both among the “normal” community (if that isn’t too unkind or dismissive a term) and among the “queer” community. Many asexuals feel marginalised and achieve solace only with like-minded people.

So it’s a Catch-22 situation. The only way we know to achieve greater understanding is to reach out to the wider world and convince them that asexuality is just fine. However, society can be unkind and the climate can be quite toxic for people that do want to speak out. The leading political parties ignored my communications, which suggests that even those that seek to represent us have no desire to acknowledge or support us.

I’m asking myself: “where do we go next?” And the answers don’t come easily.

Can you learn Danish by osmosis?

By |September 21st, 2013|Recent news|0 Comments

An interesting article on learning language by immersing oneself in a country that speaks the language.

Why are Buddhist monks attacking Muslims?

By |May 2nd, 2013|Recent news|0 Comments

It seems every religion is doomed to being twisted for the blood-hungry.